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lmd_Bony2012.bib

@comment{{This file has been generated by bib2bib 1.95}}
@comment{{Command line: /usr/bin/bib2bib --quiet -c 'not journal:"Discussions"' -c 'not journal:"Polymer Science"' -c '  author:"Bony"  ' -c year=2012 -c $type="ARTICLE" -oc lmd_Bony2012.txt -ob lmd_Bony2012.bib /home/WWW/LMD/public/Publis_LMDEMC3.link.bib}}
@article{2012GeoRL..3921801N,
  author = {{Nam}, C. and {Bony}, S. and {Dufresne}, J.-L. and {Chepfer}, H.
	},
  title = {{The {\lsquo}too few, too bright{\rsquo} tropical low-cloud problem in CMIP5 models}},
  journal = {\grl},
  keywords = {Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Cloud/radiation interaction, Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Radiation: transmission and scattering, Global Change: Atmosphere (0315, 0325), Global Change: Earth system modeling (1225, 4316), Global Change: Global climate models (3337, 4928)},
  year = 2012,
  month = nov,
  volume = 39,
  eid = {L21801},
  pages = {21801},
  abstract = {{Previous generations of climate models have been shown to under-estimate
the occurrence of tropical low-level clouds and to over-estimate their
radiative effects. This study analyzes outputs from multiple climate
models participating in the Fifth phase of the Coupled Model
Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) using the Cloud Feedback Model
Intercomparison Project Observations Simulator Package (COSP), and
compares them with different satellite data sets. Those include CALIPSO
lidar observations, PARASOL mono-directional reflectances and CERES
radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We show that current
state-of-the-art climate models predict overly bright low-clouds, even
for a correct low-cloud cover. The impact of these biases on the Earth'
radiation budget, however, is reduced by compensating errors. Those
include the tendency of models to under-estimate the low-cloud cover and
to over-estimate the occurrence of mid- and high-clouds above
low-clouds. Finally, we show that models poorly represent the dependence
of the vertical structure of low-clouds on large-scale environmental
conditions. The implications of this {\lsquo}too few, too bright
low-cloud problem{\rsquo} for climate sensitivity and model development
are discussed.
}},
  doi = {10.1029/2012GL053421},
  adsurl = {http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012GeoRL..3921801N},
  adsnote = {Provided by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System}
}
@article{2012ACP....1210817L,
  author = {{Lacour}, J.-L. and {Risi}, C. and {Clarisse}, L. and {Bony}, S. and 
	{Hurtmans}, D. and {Clerbaux}, C. and {Coheur}, P.-F.},
  title = {{Mid-tropospheric {$\delta$}D observations from IASI/MetOp at high spatial and temporal resolution}},
  journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry \& Physics},
  year = 2012,
  month = nov,
  volume = 12,
  pages = {10817-10832},
  abstract = {{In this paper we retrieve atmospheric HDO, H$_{2}$O concentrations
and their ratio {$\delta$}D from IASI radiances spectra. Our method relies
on an existing radiative transfer model (Atmosphit) and an optimal
estimation inversion scheme, but goes further than our previous work by
explicitly considering correlations between the two species. A global
HDO and H$_{2}$O a priori profile together with a covariance
matrix were built from daily LMDz-iso model simulations of HDO and
H$_{2}$O profiles over the whole globe and a whole year. The
retrieval parameters are described and characterized in terms of errors.
We show that IASI is mostly sensitive to {$\delta$}D in the middle
troposphere and allows retrieving {$\delta$}D for an integrated 3-6 km
column with an error of 38{\permil} on an individual measurement basis.
We examine the performance of the retrieval to capture the temporal
(seasonal and short-term) and spatial variations of {$\delta$}D for one
year of measurement at two dedicated sites (Darwin and Iza{\~n}a) and
a latitudinal band from -60{\deg} to 60{\deg} for a 15 day period in
January. We report a generally good agreement between IASI and the model
and indicate the capabilities of IASI to reproduce the large scale
variations of {$\delta$}D (seasonal cycle and latitudinal gradient) with
good accuracy. In particular, we show that there is no systematic
significant bias in the retrieved {$\delta$}D values in comparison with the
model, and that the retrieved variability is similar to the one in the
model even though there are certain local differences. Moreover, the
noticeable differences between IASI and the model are briefly examined
and suggest modeling issues instead of retrieval effects. Finally, the
results further reveal the unprecedented capabilities of IASI to capture
short-term variations in {$\delta$}D, highlighting the added value of the
sounder for monitoring hydrological processes.
}},
  doi = {10.5194/acp-12-10817-2012},
  adsurl = {http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ACP....1210817L},
  adsnote = {Provided by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System}
}
@article{2012JGRD..117.5304R,
  author = {{Risi}, C. and {Noone}, D. and {Worden}, J. and {Frankenberg}, C. and 
	{Stiller}, G. and {Kiefer}, M. and {Funke}, B. and {Walker}, K. and 
	{Bernath}, P. and {Schneider}, M. and {Bony}, S. and {Lee}, J. and 
	{Brown}, D. and {Sturm}, C.},
  title = {{Process-evaluation of tropospheric humidity simulated by general circulation models using water vapor isotopic observations: 2. Using isotopic diagnostics to understand the mid and upper tropospheric moist bias in the tropics and subtropics}},
  journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research (Atmospheres)},
  keywords = {general circulation models, process-based evaluation, relative humidity, water isotopes, Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Cloud physics and chemistry, Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Troposphere: composition and chemistry, Atmospheric Processes: Global climate models (1626, 4928), Atmospheric Processes: Remote sensing (4337)},
  year = 2012,
  month = mar,
  volume = 117,
  eid = {D05304},
  pages = {5304},
  abstract = {{Evaluating the representation of processes controlling tropical and
subtropical tropospheric relative humidity (RH) in atmospheric general
circulation models (GCMs) is crucial to assess the credibility of
predicted climate changes. GCMs have long exhibited a moist bias in the
tropical and subtropical mid and upper troposphere, which could be due
to the mis-representation of cloud processes or of the large-scale
circulation, or to excessive diffusion during water vapor transport. The
goal of this study is to use observations of the water vapor isotopic
ratio to understand the cause of this bias. We compare the
three-dimensional distribution of the water vapor isotopic ratio
measured from space and ground to that simulated by several versions of
the isotopic GCM LMDZ. We show that the combined evaluation of RH and of
the water vapor isotopic composition makes it possible to discriminate
the most likely cause of RH biases. Models characterized either by an
excessive vertical diffusion, an excessive convective detrainment or an
underestimated in situ cloud condensation will all produce a moist bias
in the free troposphere. However, only an excessive vertical diffusion
can lead to a reversed seasonality of the free tropospheric isotopic
composition in the subtropics compared to observations. Comparing seven
isotopic GCMs suggests that the moist bias found in many GCMs in the mid
and upper troposphere most frequently results from an excessive
diffusion during vertical water vapor transport. This study demonstrates
the added value of water vapor isotopic measurements for interpreting
shortcomings in the simulation of RH by climate models.
}},
  doi = {10.1029/2011JD016623},
  adsurl = {http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRD..117.5304R},
  adsnote = {Provided by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System}
}
@article{2012JGRD..117.5303R,
  author = {{Risi}, C. and {Noone}, D. and {Worden}, J. and {Frankenberg}, C. and 
	{Stiller}, G. and {Kiefer}, M. and {Funke}, B. and {Walker}, K. and 
	{Bernath}, P. and {Schneider}, M. and {Wunch}, D. and {Sherlock}, V. and 
	{Deutscher}, N. and {Griffith}, D. and {Wennberg}, P.~O. and 
	{Strong}, K. and {Smale}, D. and {Mahieu}, E. and {Barthlott}, S. and 
	{Hase}, F. and {Garc{\'{\i}}A}, O. and {Notholt}, J. and {Warneke}, T. and 
	{Toon}, G. and {Sayres}, D. and {Bony}, S. and {Lee}, J. and 
	{Brown}, D. and {Uemura}, R. and {Sturm}, C.},
  title = {{Process-evaluation of tropospheric humidity simulated by general circulation models using water vapor isotopologues: 1. Comparison between models and observations}},
  journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research (Atmospheres)},
  keywords = {general circulation models, process-based evaluation, relative humidity, water isotopes, Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Cloud physics and chemistry, Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Troposphere: composition and chemistry, Atmospheric Processes: Global climate models (1626, 4928), Atmospheric Processes: Regional modeling (4316), Paleoceanography: Global climate models (1626, 3337)},
  year = 2012,
  month = mar,
  volume = 117,
  eid = {D05303},
  pages = {5303},
  abstract = {{The goal of this study is to determine how H$_{2}$O and HDO
measurements in water vapor can be used to detect and diagnose biases in
the representation of processes controlling tropospheric humidity in
atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs). We analyze a large number
of isotopic data sets (four satellite, sixteen ground-based
remote-sensing, five surface in situ and three aircraft data sets) that
are sensitive to different altitudes throughout the free troposphere.
Despite significant differences between data sets, we identify some
observed HDO/H$_{2}$O characteristics that are robust across data
sets and that can be used to evaluate models. We evaluate the isotopic
GCM LMDZ, accounting for the effects of spatiotemporal sampling and
instrument sensitivity. We find that LMDZ reproduces the spatial
patterns in the lower and mid troposphere remarkably well. However, it
underestimates the amplitude of seasonal variations in isotopic
composition at all levels in the subtropics and in midlatitudes, and
this bias is consistent across all data sets. LMDZ also underestimates
the observed meridional isotopic gradient and the contrast between dry
and convective tropical regions compared to satellite data sets.
Comparison with six other isotope-enabled GCMs from the SWING2 project
shows that biases exhibited by LMDZ are common to all models. The SWING2
GCMs show a very large spread in isotopic behavior that is not obviously
related to that of humidity, suggesting water vapor isotopic
measurements could be used to expose model shortcomings. In a companion
paper, the isotopic differences between models are interpreted in terms
of biases in the representation of processes controlling humidity.
}},
  doi = {10.1029/2011JD016621},
  adsurl = {http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRD..117.5303R},
  adsnote = {Provided by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System}
}
@article{2012JCli...25.6885T,
  author = {{Tobin}, I. and {Bony}, S. and {Roca}, R.},
  title = {{Observational Evidence for Relationships between the Degree of Aggregation of Deep Convection, Water Vapor, Surface Fluxes, and Radiation}},
  journal = {Journal of Climate},
  year = 2012,
  month = oct,
  volume = 25,
  pages = {6885-6904},
  doi = {10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00258.1},
  adsurl = {http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JCli...25.6885T},
  adsnote = {Provided by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System}
}
@article{2012GeoRL..3920807B,
  author = {{Brient}, F. and {Bony}, S.},
  title = {{How may low-cloud radiative properties simulated in the current climate influence low-cloud feedbacks under global warming?}},
  journal = {\grl},
  keywords = {Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Cloud/radiation interaction, Global Change: Atmosphere (0315, 0325), Global Change: Global climate models (3337, 4928), Atmospheric Processes: Clouds and cloud feedbacks},
  year = 2012,
  month = oct,
  volume = 39,
  eid = {L20807},
  pages = {20807},
  abstract = {{The influence of cloud modelling uncertainties on the projection of the
tropical low-cloud response to global warming is explored by perturbing
model parameters of the IPSL-CM5A climate model in a range of
configurations (realistic general circulation model, aqua-planet,
single-column model). While the positive sign and the mechanism of the
low-cloud response to climate warming predicted by the model are robust,
the amplitude of the response can vary considerably depending on the
model tuning parameters. Moreover, the strength of the low-cloud
response to climate change exhibits a strong correlation with the
strength of the low-cloud radiative effects simulated in the current
climate. We show that this correlation primarily results from a local
positive feedback (referred to as the {\ldquo}beta feedback{\rdquo})
between boundary-layer cloud radiative cooling, relative humidity and
low-cloud cover. Based on this correlation and observational
constraints, it is suggested that the strength of the tropical low-cloud
feedback predicted by the IPSL-CM5A model in climate projections might
be overestimated by about fifty percent.
}},
  doi = {10.1029/2012GL053265},
  adsurl = {http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012GeoRL..3920807B},
  adsnote = {Provided by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System}
}
@article{2012JAMES...412001Z,
  author = {{Zhang}, M. and {Bretherton}, C.~S. and {Blossey}, P.~N. and 
	{Bony}, S. and {Brient}, F. and {Golaz}, J.-C.},
  title = {{The CGILS experimental design to investigate low cloud feedbacks in general circulation models by using single-column and large-eddy simulation models}},
  journal = {Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems},
  keywords = {cloud feedbacks, Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Cloud/radiation interaction, Atmospheric Processes: Clouds and cloud feedbacks, Atmospheric Processes: Global climate models (1626, 4928)},
  year = 2012,
  month = apr,
  volume = 4,
  eid = {M12001},
  pages = {12001},
  abstract = {{A surrogate climate change is designed to investigate low cloud
feedbacks in the northeastern Pacific by using Single Column Models
(SCMs), Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs), and Large Eddy Simulation models
(LES), as part of the CGILS study (CFMIP-GASS Intercomparison of LES and
SCM models). The constructed large-scale forcing fields, including
subsidence and advective tendencies, and their perturbations in the
warmer climate are shown to compare well with conditions in General
Circulation Models (GCMs), but they are free from the impact of any GCM
parameterizations. The forcing fields in the control climate are also
shown to resemble the mean conditions in the ECMWF-Interim Reanalysis.
Applications of the forcing fields in SCMs are presented. It is shown
that the idealized design can offer considerable insight into the
mechanisms of cloud feedbacks in the models. Caveats and advantages of
the design are also discussed.
}},
  doi = {10.1029/2012MS000182},
  adsurl = {http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JAMES...412001Z},
  adsnote = {Provided by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System}
}
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